Contemporary Art; FarEastAsia
Contemporary Art
New York based Independent Curator
Contemporary Art; FarEastAsia
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Young Won Kim 
1. Shadow of shadow (love)07-2, 2008, painting on bronze, 71x24x39cm.
2. Bow down, 2014, bronze, 108x55x105cm.

Artist is most well-known for his King Sejong Monument at Kwang Hwa Moon, Seoul, Korea. (Image: http://cfile214.uf.daum.net/image/11487F444FD9763E101A7B) 

During the four-decade span of his art career, Kim worked primarily on creating life-size figural sculptures. When he realized the limitations of working with anatomical structures, he began to “personalize” each body. His sculptures look as like cut-out photographs that are transformed to 3-D figures, rendering the sculptures to appear “stuck” in a timeless space.  
Source: http://vip.mk.co.kr/news/view/21/21/2144040.html

In the 1980s, Kim became a leading figure in hyper realist sculptures and by the 1990s, represented South Korea in Sao Paulo. 
The artist renders the body’s backside with great detail, while intentionally flattening the front facade - in fact, the sculptures are often without facial features. He creates emphasis on the bare essence of man, the self-divided psyche, and the illusion of “reality”. 
Source: http://biz.heraldcorp.com/view.php?ud=20130513000851 
Young Won Kim 
1. Shadow of shadow (love)07-2, 2008, painting on bronze, 71x24x39cm.
2. Bow down, 2014, bronze, 108x55x105cm.

Artist is most well-known for his King Sejong Monument at Kwang Hwa Moon, Seoul, Korea. (Image: http://cfile214.uf.daum.net/image/11487F444FD9763E101A7B) 

During the four-decade span of his art career, Kim worked primarily on creating life-size figural sculptures. When he realized the limitations of working with anatomical structures, he began to “personalize” each body. His sculptures look as like cut-out photographs that are transformed to 3-D figures, rendering the sculptures to appear “stuck” in a timeless space.  
Source: http://vip.mk.co.kr/news/view/21/21/2144040.html

In the 1980s, Kim became a leading figure in hyper realist sculptures and by the 1990s, represented South Korea in Sao Paulo. 
The artist renders the body’s backside with great detail, while intentionally flattening the front facade - in fact, the sculptures are often without facial features. He creates emphasis on the bare essence of man, the self-divided psyche, and the illusion of “reality”. 
Source: http://biz.heraldcorp.com/view.php?ud=20130513000851 
Young Won Kim 
1. Shadow of shadow (love)07-2, 2008, painting on bronze, 71x24x39cm.
2. Bow down, 2014, bronze, 108x55x105cm.

Artist is most well-known for his King Sejong Monument at Kwang Hwa Moon, Seoul, Korea. (Image: http://cfile214.uf.daum.net/image/11487F444FD9763E101A7B) 

During the four-decade span of his art career, Kim worked primarily on creating life-size figural sculptures. When he realized the limitations of working with anatomical structures, he began to “personalize” each body. His sculptures look as like cut-out photographs that are transformed to 3-D figures, rendering the sculptures to appear “stuck” in a timeless space.  
Source: http://vip.mk.co.kr/news/view/21/21/2144040.html

In the 1980s, Kim became a leading figure in hyper realist sculptures and by the 1990s, represented South Korea in Sao Paulo. 
The artist renders the body’s backside with great detail, while intentionally flattening the front facade - in fact, the sculptures are often without facial features. He creates emphasis on the bare essence of man, the self-divided psyche, and the illusion of “reality”. 
Source: http://biz.heraldcorp.com/view.php?ud=20130513000851 
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Young Won Kim 
One of the most influential modern sculptors of Korea - explanation on its way!
Young Won Kim 
One of the most influential modern sculptors of Korea - explanation on its way!
Young Won Kim 
One of the most influential modern sculptors of Korea - explanation on its way!
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Surrealist wooden sculptures by Korean contemporary artist Kyung Sun Jun. 
Jun’s work is an attempt to capture the loss of intimate relationships in our hyper competitive post-modern society and its resulting feelings of isolation and anxiety. 
Source: 
http://artdaily.or.kr/n_news/news/news_frame.html?no=1126&search_string=&page=9&PHPSESSID=7f98d3378f2e3ee17cac10cde604f9a3


[출처] The Transparent Space 투명한 세계 - 전경선|작성자 BMM
Surrealist wooden sculptures by Korean contemporary artist Kyung Sun Jun. 
Jun’s work is an attempt to capture the loss of intimate relationships in our hyper competitive post-modern society and its resulting feelings of isolation and anxiety. 
Source: 
http://artdaily.or.kr/n_news/news/news_frame.html?no=1126&search_string=&page=9&PHPSESSID=7f98d3378f2e3ee17cac10cde604f9a3


[출처] The Transparent Space 투명한 세계 - 전경선|작성자 BMM
Surrealist wooden sculptures by Korean contemporary artist Kyung Sun Jun. 
Jun’s work is an attempt to capture the loss of intimate relationships in our hyper competitive post-modern society and its resulting feelings of isolation and anxiety. 
Source: 
http://artdaily.or.kr/n_news/news/news_frame.html?no=1126&search_string=&page=9&PHPSESSID=7f98d3378f2e3ee17cac10cde604f9a3


[출처] The Transparent Space 투명한 세계 - 전경선|작성자 BMM
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I would not call my going to the West a “trip,” because that implies a notion of rest or leisure. For my wife and I, it’s a long, arduous journey. My work begins with the moment I set out on the road. 
 
 
 
Photographer PARK JOON has an insatiable thirst for vast, desolate landscapes. Since the early 90s, Korean-born artist has traveled to the extreme corners of the world such as, the Gobi Desert in China and the wildlife in the American West, to capture a fragment of their splendor. 
 
Park’s work is as honest and sincere as the artist himself – for more than a decade, he and his beloved wife would leave their temporary jobs in New York City, pack bare necessities for survival in their rundown sedan, and drive in the general direction of “west” in search of sceneries that may entice him. With a block frame of time and a very tight budget, the two sojourners embark on what is more than a mere artistic project - they set out with a relief of leaving behind the pressures of everyday life and a childlike hope of finding renewed vitality, healing, and a glimpse of an unearthly beauty. Park claims to feel the most alive when he is in the midst of barren lands that deceptively stretch without an end. 
 
Park also insists on continuing the traditional method of photography. Following his role model, Ansel Adam’s process and aesthetic, Park spends grueling weeks personally developing his work. Worn and abused from years of being exposed to harmful chemicals, Park’s hands show his passion and integrity for his vocation. 
 
The finished products are crisp and intensely dramatized monochrome photographs of sand dunes, curving hills, streams, and mountains from uncanny angles. These works are awe-inspiring and invoke the blissful moment the photographer would have experienced at the site. Park’s works are beyond the landscape itself, however. They represent the far-reaching depth of human longing for something greater than the tangible reality. 
 
A word that resonates with his work and life is “survival”. Park recalled a time when he first caught the sounds of life after nightfall in the desert. From this moment on, he began to see more clearly the images he wanted to capture. There are many levels of “surviving” in our journey of life – from overcoming the chocking conditions and economic pressures in our competitive society, to confronting an unidentifiable desire to escape and go beyond the finite and the mortal. Park continues to daringly confront the two head-on.
 

Park’s encounter with these landscapes can be likened to being fed a satisfying, spiritual feast after a long, gruesome fast. As Park prepares to leave again for the West – this time for a longer period that may extend to several years – the rest of us anticipate his next set of work that will offer a vicarious, otherworldly freedom, as well as uncomfortable longings that tug at our conscience and soul.

J.LEE 

——
Upcoming exhibition 
America the Beautiful
April 29th – May 13th, 2014 
RECEPTION: SATURDAY, May, 3rd, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Riverside GalleryOne Riverside sq. Suite 201Hackensack, NJ 07601
 
I would not call my going to the West a “trip,” because that implies a notion of rest or leisure. For my wife and I, it’s a long, arduous journey. My work begins with the moment I set out on the road. 
 
 
 
Photographer PARK JOON has an insatiable thirst for vast, desolate landscapes. Since the early 90s, Korean-born artist has traveled to the extreme corners of the world such as, the Gobi Desert in China and the wildlife in the American West, to capture a fragment of their splendor. 
 
Park’s work is as honest and sincere as the artist himself – for more than a decade, he and his beloved wife would leave their temporary jobs in New York City, pack bare necessities for survival in their rundown sedan, and drive in the general direction of “west” in search of sceneries that may entice him. With a block frame of time and a very tight budget, the two sojourners embark on what is more than a mere artistic project - they set out with a relief of leaving behind the pressures of everyday life and a childlike hope of finding renewed vitality, healing, and a glimpse of an unearthly beauty. Park claims to feel the most alive when he is in the midst of barren lands that deceptively stretch without an end. 
 
Park also insists on continuing the traditional method of photography. Following his role model, Ansel Adam’s process and aesthetic, Park spends grueling weeks personally developing his work. Worn and abused from years of being exposed to harmful chemicals, Park’s hands show his passion and integrity for his vocation. 
 
The finished products are crisp and intensely dramatized monochrome photographs of sand dunes, curving hills, streams, and mountains from uncanny angles. These works are awe-inspiring and invoke the blissful moment the photographer would have experienced at the site. Park’s works are beyond the landscape itself, however. They represent the far-reaching depth of human longing for something greater than the tangible reality. 
 
A word that resonates with his work and life is “survival”. Park recalled a time when he first caught the sounds of life after nightfall in the desert. From this moment on, he began to see more clearly the images he wanted to capture. There are many levels of “surviving” in our journey of life – from overcoming the chocking conditions and economic pressures in our competitive society, to confronting an unidentifiable desire to escape and go beyond the finite and the mortal. Park continues to daringly confront the two head-on.
 

Park’s encounter with these landscapes can be likened to being fed a satisfying, spiritual feast after a long, gruesome fast. As Park prepares to leave again for the West – this time for a longer period that may extend to several years – the rest of us anticipate his next set of work that will offer a vicarious, otherworldly freedom, as well as uncomfortable longings that tug at our conscience and soul.

J.LEE 

——
Upcoming exhibition 
America the Beautiful
April 29th – May 13th, 2014 
RECEPTION: SATURDAY, May, 3rd, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Riverside GalleryOne Riverside sq. Suite 201Hackensack, NJ 07601
 
I would not call my going to the West a “trip,” because that implies a notion of rest or leisure. For my wife and I, it’s a long, arduous journey. My work begins with the moment I set out on the road. 
 
 
 
Photographer PARK JOON has an insatiable thirst for vast, desolate landscapes. Since the early 90s, Korean-born artist has traveled to the extreme corners of the world such as, the Gobi Desert in China and the wildlife in the American West, to capture a fragment of their splendor. 
 
Park’s work is as honest and sincere as the artist himself – for more than a decade, he and his beloved wife would leave their temporary jobs in New York City, pack bare necessities for survival in their rundown sedan, and drive in the general direction of “west” in search of sceneries that may entice him. With a block frame of time and a very tight budget, the two sojourners embark on what is more than a mere artistic project - they set out with a relief of leaving behind the pressures of everyday life and a childlike hope of finding renewed vitality, healing, and a glimpse of an unearthly beauty. Park claims to feel the most alive when he is in the midst of barren lands that deceptively stretch without an end. 
 
Park also insists on continuing the traditional method of photography. Following his role model, Ansel Adam’s process and aesthetic, Park spends grueling weeks personally developing his work. Worn and abused from years of being exposed to harmful chemicals, Park’s hands show his passion and integrity for his vocation. 
 
The finished products are crisp and intensely dramatized monochrome photographs of sand dunes, curving hills, streams, and mountains from uncanny angles. These works are awe-inspiring and invoke the blissful moment the photographer would have experienced at the site. Park’s works are beyond the landscape itself, however. They represent the far-reaching depth of human longing for something greater than the tangible reality. 
 
A word that resonates with his work and life is “survival”. Park recalled a time when he first caught the sounds of life after nightfall in the desert. From this moment on, he began to see more clearly the images he wanted to capture. There are many levels of “surviving” in our journey of life – from overcoming the chocking conditions and economic pressures in our competitive society, to confronting an unidentifiable desire to escape and go beyond the finite and the mortal. Park continues to daringly confront the two head-on.
 

Park’s encounter with these landscapes can be likened to being fed a satisfying, spiritual feast after a long, gruesome fast. As Park prepares to leave again for the West – this time for a longer period that may extend to several years – the rest of us anticipate his next set of work that will offer a vicarious, otherworldly freedom, as well as uncomfortable longings that tug at our conscience and soul.

J.LEE 

——
Upcoming exhibition 
America the Beautiful
April 29th – May 13th, 2014 
RECEPTION: SATURDAY, May, 3rd, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Riverside GalleryOne Riverside sq. Suite 201Hackensack, NJ 07601
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One of my favorite artists right now - Haegue Yang
"My belief is that there is a mysteriousness and spirituality in the most banal things. so my interest might be to reveal or make a crack in that mundaneness and show a glimpse of the miraculous." 
Read more in this interview in Flash Art, 2012 - http://www.heikejung.de/texts_2012.01_FlashArt_Interview_Yang_email.pdf
One of my favorite artists right now - Haegue Yang
"My belief is that there is a mysteriousness and spirituality in the most banal things. so my interest might be to reveal or make a crack in that mundaneness and show a glimpse of the miraculous." 
Read more in this interview in Flash Art, 2012 - http://www.heikejung.de/texts_2012.01_FlashArt_Interview_Yang_email.pdf
One of my favorite artists right now - Haegue Yang
"My belief is that there is a mysteriousness and spirituality in the most banal things. so my interest might be to reveal or make a crack in that mundaneness and show a glimpse of the miraculous." 
Read more in this interview in Flash Art, 2012 - http://www.heikejung.de/texts_2012.01_FlashArt_Interview_Yang_email.pdf
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Pray for Korea.
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Byoungho Kim‘s The Progression of Silence engages sight and sound, using an aesthetically and aurally pleasing repetition of bells. A site-specific installation, Kim constructed the massive work from brass, piezo, signal wire and a sound controller, to hang in the spiral stair case of the Johnnie Walker House, an arts exhibition space opened in 2013 buy the famous whisky distiller. The piece hangs from the roof of the building down to the floor, engaging the entirety of the architecture, and with sound, the people inside the building. Says Kim, “One of the “materials” I like to use is sound. The essence of sound is the vibrations of frequency, and these vibrations are often seen as geometric patterns to the eye. Through the process of changing these geometric patterns, namely modulation, they become sounds for the artworks.”
Kim fully explains his process, “My work is an approach toward the rationality that was spontaneously generated with the progression of civilization such as systems, standards and modules. The unitized and systemized material/immaterial elements become the material of my work. The output created from my materials poses questions on the essence of life as well as being a study on human nature.” (via myampgoesto11)

SOURCE: http://beautifuldecay.com/2014/04/23/byoungho-kims-progression-silence-engages-sight-sound/
Byoungho Kim‘s The Progression of Silence engages sight and sound, using an aesthetically and aurally pleasing repetition of bells. A site-specific installation, Kim constructed the massive work from brass, piezo, signal wire and a sound controller, to hang in the spiral stair case of the Johnnie Walker House, an arts exhibition space opened in 2013 buy the famous whisky distiller. The piece hangs from the roof of the building down to the floor, engaging the entirety of the architecture, and with sound, the people inside the building. Says Kim, “One of the “materials” I like to use is sound. The essence of sound is the vibrations of frequency, and these vibrations are often seen as geometric patterns to the eye. Through the process of changing these geometric patterns, namely modulation, they become sounds for the artworks.”
Kim fully explains his process, “My work is an approach toward the rationality that was spontaneously generated with the progression of civilization such as systems, standards and modules. The unitized and systemized material/immaterial elements become the material of my work. The output created from my materials poses questions on the essence of life as well as being a study on human nature.” (via myampgoesto11)

SOURCE: http://beautifuldecay.com/2014/04/23/byoungho-kims-progression-silence-engages-sight-sound/
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 Chul Hyun Ahn‘s “Railroad Nostalgia
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Ahn Chulhyun, 
 
 
Baltimore-based artist Ahn Chulhyun works with fluorescent tube lights, plywood and mirrors to create optical illusions that transcend both time and space. The artist’s rendering of space elicits contemplation into the deep abyss – exploring the physical and spiritual. Chulhyun first began his career painting in an abstract geometric style reflecting layers of paint that created an illusion of depth. His earlier print and painting concepts were further transmitted to his three-dimensional works following his studies at the Maryland Institute College of Art (2002). His recent ‘mirror drawings’ – one of a kind - show light elapsing through hand-drawn lines etched into mirrors, which remain a continuation of his previous working concept of space. 
Source: 
http://www.hadacontemporary.com/ahn-chulhyun/
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'temporary ward' by wang qingsong (2008)180 x 300cm